The problem of ‘long haul’ COVID

  data-srcset=
Long COVID is neither well-defined nor well understood, in part because the research base is still in its infancy.  Photo: Getty Images

(Carolyn Barber/ Scientific American) — It was just a couple of months into the pandemic when patients in online support groups began describing the phenomenon. In some emergency departments, they said, their complaints were largely being dismissed—or at the very least diminished—by health care professionals. The patients felt they were not being heard, or perhaps even were outright disbelieved.

The common thread through these comments was a basic one. Each of the patients had already been infected with COVID-19 and presumably had recovered, yet each was still dealing with symptoms of the disease—sometimes vague, sometimes nonspecific—that simply would not go away.

Physicians and nurses, already overloaded with emergent cases of the virus, were baffled, often searching for other, more benign explanations for what they were being told.

We now have a term for those patients—and the truth is, “long hauler” only begins to describe the COVID-related ordeals they are enduring. Of all the facets of the virus we have dealt with in 2020, this one may ultimately prove the most difficult to recognize, much less combat. (…)

[button href=”https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-problem-of-long-haul-covid/” arrow=”true” new_tab=”true”]read full story[/button]:

Categories

Categories