Alzheimer’s directly kills brain cells that keep you awake

Brain tissue from deceased patients with Alzheimer’s has more tau protein buildup (brown spots) and fewer neurons (red spots) compared to healthy brain tissue. (Image: © Grinberg lab/UCSF)

(Yasemin Saplakoglu/ Live Science) — Alzheimer’s disease might be attacking the brain cells responsible for keeping people awake, resulting in daytime napping, according to a new study.

Excessive daytime napping might thus be considered an early symptom of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a statement from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

Some previous studies suggested that such sleepiness in patients with Alzheimer’s results directly from poor nighttime sleep due to the disease, while others have suggested that sleep problems might cause the disease to progress. The new study suggests a more direct biological pathway between Alzheimer’s disease and daytime sleepiness.

In the current study, researchers studied the brains of 13 people who’d had Alzheimer’s and died, as well as the brains from seven people who had not had the disease. The researchers specifically examined three parts of the brain that are involved in keeping us awake: the locus coeruleus, the lateral hypothalamic area and the tuberomammillary nucleus. These three parts of the brain work together in a network to keep us awake during the day. (…)

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